Blue smoke and mirrors.

From the VQR archives, a 1982 review of Larry Sabato’s “The Rise of Political Consultants: New Ways of Winning Elections” that contains some great history about Virginia politics: One may wonder whether it was just coincidence that the decline of the Virginia boss system occurred almost simultaneously with the rise of the consultant system. The …

Ash Gilbertson’s photos of Iraq.

At VQR we’re providing Ashley Gilbertson’s “Last Photographs” as a preview of our summer issue. Gilbertson is a seasoned Iraq War photographer, and the photo essay is a chilling and revealing account of his most recent visit there. He was interviewed about the essay on “Fresh Air” last week, and we had him in town …

The long-distance walking craze of the 1870s.

From the Autumn 1980 issue of VQR: The United States of America, in those bursting decades after the Civil War, was in the full grip of a long-distance walking craze and didn’t care who knew it. Journeymen printers and mechanics walked 20 to 60 miles a day, looking for work, and Horace Greeley often boasted …

Bulletin wins top prize at Ellies.

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists was just presented with the General Excellence award in the under 100,000 circulation category at the National Magazine Awards, beating out Virginia Quarterly Review. (We won the category last year.) It’s disappointing, obviously, but The Bulletin is an impressive publication, so there’s no begrudging them their victory.

VQR on borders and barriers.

Crosses along the border wall memorialize those who didn’t make it (Kay Fochtmann / CC) The newly-released spring issue of Virginia Quarterly Review is dedicated to the topic of border walls, notably those found in Israel, the United States, China and formerly in Germany. It’s the pair of articles about the U.S. / Mexico border …